CMBA Blogathon: Fabulous Films of the ’50s – Some Like it Hot (1959)

This post is part of the CMBA Fabulous Films of the ’50s Blogathon hosted by the Classic Movie Blog Association. You can find a list of participating blogs and read all the great posts by visiting the CMBA website.

Some Like it Hot (1959)My apologies in advance for this post being somewhat scattered, but a recent death in the family has had me feeling down and preoccupied, so I’m not quite at my best this week. For what it’s worth, following are just a few of my thoughts on the classic comedy Some Like it Hot (1959), a movie about two male jazz musicians who after witnessing a mob hit, disguise themselves as women to “hide out” by traveling the country with an all female jazz band. The movie stars Jack Lemmon, Tony Curtis and Marilyn Monroe and was directed by Billy Wilder.

I’m not sure what it is about me and covering an almost universally loved classic comedy for a blogathon, but much like the time I wrote about Bringing Up Baby (1938) for a TCM Summer Under the Stars blogathon a few years ago, I feel like I need to hang my head in shame for not loving the movie Some Like It Hot (1959) as much as it seems I “should.”

It’s number one on the AFI’s list of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time and a favorite of just about every classic film fan I’ve ever heard mention it, so I was surprised when I realized about halfway through the movie that I probably wasn’t going to share the same sentiment.

I’m not at all saying that I didn’t like the movie because I did, I just didn’t connect with it in a way that would put it near the top of my favorites list. I swear, I really do have a great sense of humor, but just going off of AFI’s list, I much prefer the comedy of films like The Philadelphia Story (1940), It Happened One Night (1934) or His Girl Friday (1940).

Anyway, much like I did for Bringing Up Baby, I’m not going to focus on the negative here. What I will be doing is discussing a few random items related to the movie, and my apologies again, I do mean random. :-) Continue reading →

Back from a Break! Random Movie Thoughts

Ahhh, it feels so good to be back writing for my blog again! I’ve been taking a bit of an unplanned break from blogging lately so it’s been a while since I’ve posted anything. My writing skills have gotten a bit rusty so I thought I’d start with something simple just to get myself going again.

I’m basically going to list some of the movies I’ve watched recently and include some random thoughts and/or resource links related to each movie.

In no particular viewing order, here are a few of the movies I’ve watched recently:

Princess O’Rourke (1943)

  • I couldn’t believe it when I realized it, but it took me over half the movie to recognize Jane Wyman! I think it was because I’m so used to seeing her with bangs (like the picture on the left below) but instead her hair looked more like the picture on the right.
  • Jack Carson was someone I never really cared for in the past, but I really liked him in this movie! I suspect that I was unfairly overlooking his talent, and I look forward to watching more of his movies.
  • This was a charming comedy that I think fans of co-stars Olivia DeHavilland, Robert Cummings, Jack Carson, Jane Wyman, or Charles Coburn would really enjoy. The DVD is currently available for purchase from the Warner Archive.

Continue reading →

Saturday State Post: Classic Movie Actors from Massachusetts

In this week’s actors by state post, I looked to the eastern United States for the first time by the choosing the state of Massachusetts. Today’s list contains two co-stars of the 1962 movie Days of Wine and Roses along with two actresses who achieved notable firsts for women in the film industry.

Bette Davis

Born:  April 15, 1908 in Lowell, MA

Died:  October 6, 1989 (age 81)

Married four times including once to her All About Eve co-star Gary Merrill

Known for the Movies:  Of Human Bondage, Jezebel, Now Voyager, All About Eve

 

Interesting Facts About Bette Davis:

  • She was nominated for an Academy Award five years in a row from 1939-1943, a record she shares with Greer Garson.
  • She was the first female president of the American Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences as well as the first female to be awarded a Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Film Institute.
  • Along with John Garfield and Jules Stein, she was instrumental in creating the Hollywood Canteen, a club that offered food and entertainment to U.S. service men and women. In later years Bette commented, “There are few accomplishments in my life that I am sincerely proud of. The Hollywood Canteen is one of them.” Continue reading →