Saturday State Post with a Twist: Classic Movie Actors from Europe/Asia

A list that doesn’t include Cary Grant, no matter the topic, just doesn’t seem right to me. So in this week’s Saturday State Post I’ll be mixing things up a little by venturing outside of the United States and into Europe and Asia. There are sooo many great actors and actresses including Cary Grant who were born in other countries that it only seemed fair to “bend the rules” a little bit and include them in my “state’ series.

A few of the actors and actresses from Europe and Asia are:

Claude Rains

Claude Rains

Born:  November 10, 1889 in Camberwell, London, England

Died:  May 30, 1967 (age 77)

Married six times

Known for the Movies:  Mystery of Edwin Drood, The Adventures of Robin Hood, Four Daughters, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Now Voyager, Casablanca, Mr. Skeffington, Notorious, Lawrence of Arabia

My Favorite Claude Rains Movie:  Casablanca

 
 
Interesting Facts About Claude Rains:

  • He once had a very serious Cockney accent and a speech impediment, which were corrected with the help of elocution lessons paid for by Sir Herbert Beerbohm Tree, founder of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London. Rains later served as a teacher there before coming to Hollywood, with Laurence Olivier being his best known student.
  • He was one of Bette Davis’ favorite actors (she had great taste!), and they made four films together; Jaurez (1939) Now Voyager (1942), Mr. Skeffington (1944) and Deception (1946).
  • Unlike many Hollywood actors, he is not buried in Hollywood but in New Hampshire, a state in which he lived for a brief time. He is buried at Red Hill Cemetery in Moultonborough, New Hampshire. You can read more about his burial place and see a few cool pictures including his headstone on J.W.’s blog Odd Things I’ve Seen. I would love to go visit the site myself someday.

Charles Boyer Continue reading →

Classical Music in Old Movies: The Blue Danube Waltz

Statue of Johann Strauss II, Vienna Austria

What do old movies and classical music have in common? I’m sure there are many possible answers to that and you could name a few of your own, but for me it’s that I once thought they were both boring and something I would never enjoy. Which makes me wonder now, what the heck was wrong with me?! I only have myself to blame for the way I felt about old movies, but with classical music? I sort of blame McDonald’s for that one! :-)

Okay, so I’m only half joking about that but if you remember this popular McDonald’s Commercial from 1986 it might help to understand why (although after reading the comments on YouTube, I think I may be the only one who didn’t like it!) Continue reading →