Choosing a Favorite Alfred Hitchcock Movie: Is it Even Possible?

Alfred Hitchcock

What makes a great director? I’m almost embarrassed to say I don’t really know. I’d love to be more knowledgeable about the role of a director and more specifically what qualities make one great, but I don’t exactly know what to look for to make that determination.

So I certainly would never make the claim that Alfred Hitchcock is the best director ever, but just based on how many of his movies I really like/love, I can definitely say he is my favorite.

Alfred Hitchcock Movies on the Big Screen

I recently had the chance to see the Hitchcock directed movie The 39 Steps (1935) at a local theater. Well, if you can call a 2 1/2 hour round trip drive, local. :-) The theater was running a special promotion that day where if you wrote the name of your favorite Alfred Hitchcock movie on a card, admission was free.

Notorious (1946) Cary Grant & Ingrid BergmanThe theater also mentioned that they will consider showing another of Hitchcock’s movies in the future from the titles they collected. So when it came time to choose a movie, I realized I could either pick my true favorite or instead go with one that I thought would be more impressive to see on the big screen.

For example, even though it’s not one of my top favorites, I considered writing down North by Northwest (1959) just because I think it would be awesome to see in a theater. Crop dusting scene anyone? :-)

My Top Five Favorite Alfred Hitchcock Movies – Or Are They?

I ended up writing down what I think is my true favorite, Notorious (1946), but before I did I expressed on Twitter that I wasn’t sure if I could even choose a favorite. When prompted by a follower to narrow it down to a top five, I deliberated quickly and came up with the following:

     

  1. Notorious (1946)
  2. Vertigo (1958)
  3. Shadow of a Doubt (1943)
  4. Foreign Correspondent (1940)
  5. Rebecca (1940)

The top three were fairly easy to decide upon, but the last two were a bit tougher and could easily be interchanged with a few others including Rear Window (1954), Marnie (1964) or possibly even The 39 Steps, which I just saw and thought was a great movie. Obviously there is no right or wrong answer and this list can and probably will change over time, but it was still fun to look through Hitchcock’s filmography and realize just how many of his movies I love.

What is your favorite Alfred Hitchcock movie? If like me, it’s too difficult to choose just one, go ahead and list your top 5, top 10. And hey, if you’re not a fan of Hitchcock, let me know that as well. It’s always interesting to hear differing opinions.

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P.S. I’m super excited that I get to see Rear Window on the big screen tonight, thanks to Turner Classic Movies and Fathom Events! Were you able to attend one of these screenings?

The Madeleine Carroll Blogathon: Madeleine’s Most Frequent Movie Collaborations

Madeleine Carroll Blogathon

This post is part of the Madeleine Carroll Blogathon and Birthday Bash being hosted by Dorian at Tales of the Easily Distracted and Ruth from Silver Screenings.

I was originally going to review Honeymoon in Bali (1939) for this post but decided to go a different route instead. I did watch the movie and even though I found it to be pleasant with enjoyable performances by Madeleine Carroll and Fred MacMurray, the movie didn’t really inspire me to write a review.

I guess you could say the Washington Post summed up my thoughts when in a review on October 5, 1939 they exclaimed, “‘Honeymoon in Bali’ Is Delightfully Easy To Take!” I also realized that another blogger was writing about the movie for this blogathon so to learn more about the movie I will instead direct you to the post by Joey at Wolffian Classics Movie Digest.

Honeymoon in Bali (1939)

In becoming more familiar with the movies of Madeleine Carroll, I discovered that not only did she make four other movies with Fred MacMurray, there were also a few other people in the movie industry that she worked with multiple times. So I thought I would explore a few of those collaborations in more detail. Continue reading →

Quote of the Day: Alfred Hitchcock Movies

I’ve never done a quote of the day post before, but I just wanted to quickly share this one with you as it is one of my new favorites:

“Bad movies are photographs of people talking. A Hitchcock movie is a photograph of people thinking.”

I heard it the other day while watching a special feature included with the DVD of Alfred Hitchcock’s I Confess (1953), a movie starring Montgomery Clift and Anne Baxter. From what I could tell, it was a quote made by Alfred Hitchcock himself. I think it is perfectly illustrated in that movie, especially when it comes to Clift’s performance and the expressiveness of his eyes.

I love great quotes, so I hope to do more of these short posts in the future.