Old Movies Nostalgia

Remembering My Mom on Mother’s Day: A Love for The Perils of Pauline (1947)

Mother’s Day has been bittersweet for me the last several years, ever since I lost my mom in 2007. Bitter because she is no longer here with us, but sweet because I have such great memories of her as the most wonderful mom ever, and because I was the mom of two sweet cats who brought so much joy to my life. Unfortunately, this year is a little less sweet than most, because I lost both of those kitties in the past year, one just last week in fact. But even though it’s a sad time for me right now, I am still blessed with those great memories of my mom and also time spent with my newest cat Stanley, who I adopted earlier this year.

Perils of Pauline (1947)

I was just thinking the other day about one vivid classic movie related memory I have of my mom, so I thought I’d share it today on Mother’s Day. When I was young, my mom mentioned quite often how much she loved the movie The Perils of Pauline (1947). It was her favorite in fact.

The movie which starred Betty Hutton and John Lund, told the real life story of actress Pearl White and her rise to fame in silent movies. When the VCR and VHS tapes came along, my mom had the long desired ability to watch the movie as often as she liked, which she did many times.

My mom and dad didn’t really watch many classic movies when I was younger and I didn’t start liking them until I was in college, so I didn’t think I’d share her love for the movie and never even gave thought to the idea of watching it with her. Just based on the title and the cover photo of Betty Hutton swinging on a rope, I just assumed it would be a “dorky” movie.

Perils of Pauline (1947)

Of course I feel bad now that I never took the time to watch it with her especially because I did eventually come to appreciate classic movies while she was still alive. Being the loving, forgiving mom that she was I’m sure she didn’t mind, but if I could go back in time you can bet that I would take her love for the movie more seriously and watch it with her.

If your mom is still with you and you have the opportunity to spend time with her doing the things she loves, I would encourage you to do so and hope you are able to appreciate those simple moments with her. In fact, it would make me happy if some day soon you watched one of her favorite movies with her in my mom’s honor. :-)

Wishing all moms a happy and blessed Mother’s Day!

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P.S. What are some of the classic movies you have enjoyed watching with your mom?

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25 Classic Movies That are Turning 75 in 2015

Broadway Melody of 1940

I got the idea for this post from a pin I saw the other day on Pinterest for 15 films that are turning 30 in 2015. After reading that post, I thought I’d do a classic film version of my own.

I just randomly chose 75 years as the time period and when I looked backed at the films that were released in 1940, I realized it was a very good year for movies, which included several of my personal favorites.

Speaking of Pinterest, if you ever pin to or visit that site I’d love for you to come follow me there. Also let me know if you have an account and I will follow your boards as well. I don’t pin often, but I do stop by on occasion when I find a cool or inspiring picture to share.

Below are 25 movies that will be turning 75 years old in 2015. I put an * next to those that I have seen before, two if the film is a favorite of mine. As you can see, I still have quite a few good movies left to watch for the first time. (hiding my head in shame that I’ve yet to see The Grapes of Wrath) Read More…

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Little Women 1933 vs. 1949 . . . and Dumb & Dumber (1994)?

Little Women 1994I am disappointed in myself regarding two things; 1) That I’ve never read “Little Women,” the classic novel by Louisa May Alcott about four sisters growing up in New England during the Civil War and 2) That back in 1994 (was that really over 20 years ago already?!) I was faced with the decision to go see one of two movies with my three sisters, Little Women or Dumb and Dumber, and while two of my sisters chose the former, my other sister and I chose the latter.

What was I thinking? I love comedies because I love to laugh, but disgusting “bathroom humor” is just not for me and that movie had plenty of it. You can bet that if I had that choice to make over again, I would have gone to see Little Women instead, especially since, come on, four sisters watching a movie about four sisters? What could be more fitting than that? :-)

I have yet to watch the 1994 movie, but I have now watched both the 1933 and 1949 versions. Thanks to my love of listening to podcasts I recently discovered a wonderful interview with actress Margaret O’Brien through the Warner Archive Collection Podcast. In the interview Margaret talked about what a great time she had filming Little Women (1949) with co-stars June Allyson, Elizabeth Taylor, and Janet Leigh, and it inspired me to watch both of the older films. I wasn’t necessarily watching them both to compare the two, but I was curious to see if I would like one more than the other. Keep in mind that my opinions are somewhat skewed because I wasn’t familiar with the story not having read the book, but I did indeed have a definite preference of the two. Read More…

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The Great Villain Blogathon – Orson Welles as Harry Lime

Spoilers Ahead: Although I don’t go very deep into the plot of the movie The Third Man (1949), some of my comments may reveal key plot twists and bits of dialogue that could detract from your enjoyment of the movie if you have yet to see it.

This post is part of the Great Villian Blogathon hosted by Ruth of Silver ScreeningsKaren of Shadows & Satin, and Kristina of Speakeasy. Please visit any of those wonderful sites to read more posts about great movie villains.

Sometimes an actor or actress will appear in a movie for just a short amount of time but will still make an enormous impact that is felt for a long time afterward. There may be no better example of this than the appearance of Orson Welles in The Third Man (1949).

Orson Welles as Harry Lime in The Third Man

Although he doesn’t appear until a little over an hour into the film and only appears in a few key scenes, his character of Harry Lime is considered by many to be one of the most fascinating and mysterious movie villains of all time. And I know I’m not alone in thinking his first appearance in the film was one of the most “electrifying” in movie history.

One look at the expression on his face may be all you need to see to understand just how devious yet charismatic Harry Lime was. In his review of the movie, Roger Ebert described the entrance this way, “The sequence is unforgettable: the meow of the cat in the doorway, the big shoes, the defiant challenge by Holly, the light in the window, and then the shot, pushing in, on Lime’s face, enigmatic and teasing, as if two college chums had been caught playing a naughty prank.” Read More…

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CMBA Blogathon: Film Passion 101: The Philadelphia Story

FilmPassionBlogathon2

This post is part of the Film Passion 101 Blogathon, hosted by the Classic Movie Blog Association. Be sure to head over there and read all the other great posts!

I have a bad habit of saying I don’t like things when I haven’t even given them a try. I’m sure that habit has caused me to miss out on some great things in life, and I really should learn to break it. Well, except maybe when it comes to beets it would have been wiser to stick to the stubborn “I don’t like them even though I’ve never tried them” declaration that I made for so long. Beets really are gross! :-)

_Theater for Twitter

On a serious note, that habit did almost cause me to miss out on something that I now love dearly and that has had a profound impact on my life, watching classic or “old” movies. For the longest time I insisted that I didn’t like old black and white movies when I had never even tried watching one. I just knew they would be boring, outdated, and corny and I wouldn’t like them. There wasn’t much anyone was going to say or do to get me to watch them. Or so I thought!

Unlike many of the other participants in this blogathon, I wasn’t exposed to old movies very much when I was growing up. My dad watched things like Abbott and Costello, Laurel and Hardy (thanks for the reminder, Ruth!), and maybe a western here and there, and I have vague memories of my mom watching Gone With the Wind at some point, but that’s about it. Of course I did watch The Wizard of Oz quite a few times as a kid, but I honestly thought at the time that it was a current movie, not an old classic. Read More…

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